Three Ways To Care For Stainless Steel In Your Kitchen

KitchenCookingAreaStainless steel is a staple in all commercial kitchens, and when properly looked after, it can be found shining everywhere from your worktops to the sinksworktopsrefrigeration, and the cooking and dishwashing equipment. There are a number of reasons for this prevalence, but mostly, stainless steel is used throughout because it is very durable, safe for food preparation, resists corrosion more so than other materials (resist is the key word here) and it is nonporous, so moisture, bacteria and other harmful remnants can’t easily seep into the material. However, contrary to popular belief, stainless steel can stain and even rust if not properly maintained. Here are some tips for cleaning and maintaining your stainless steel surfaces in the kitchen – or indeed anywhere it’s found – so you get rust-free service for years:

  1. Always use soft cloths, rags and sponges when cleaning the surfaces of your countertops, sink bowls, and your stainless steel equipment. Abrasive brushes, scrapers and steel wool can quickly scratch and damage the thin film shield that protects the steel, creating a better opportunity for rust to form. Also, it is a general tip that you should clean going with the grain line. Usually, you can see  which way the grain of the steel is going and it’s best to polish going with- not against- that line.
  2. Be sure to clean your stainless surfaces regularly and use the right sanitising cleaners, keeping in mind the recommended concentration of your cleaner. Cleaning solutions like alkaline and alkaline-chlorinated cleaners should be used whereas traditional chloride solutions are advised against. High chlorine content is not recommended for stainless steel cleaning as it will eventually pit and rust the steel surface. If you do use chlorinated cleaners, be sure to check the concentration and strength, and then rinse it off quickly, before wiping down and drying the stainless surface.
  3. Hard water is one of the hardest things on stainless steel (no pun intended). Many commercial food  businesses know this all too well and have equipped their water supply with  filtration systems to soften the water by sifting through some of the harsh chemicals that result in deposits, spots, and eventually, rust. Furthermore, hard water when heated can leave deposits on your steel surfaces which will eat through the protective film, causing rust, once again. Knowing this, it’s important to keep water from standing on surfaces and wipe down moisture whenever you can.

Blog post by Ian Canavan www.busychef.co.uk

Lincat’s UK manufactured energy-efficient induction hob

Lincat, the UK’s leading manufacturer of commercial catering equipment, has added an induction hob to its professional range of over 450 products for cooking, holding and display.

Manufactured at Lincat’s purpose-built factory in Lincoln, the IH21’s energy-efficient induction technology can help businesses to reduce operating costs and maintain a more comfortable kitchen temperature, while delivering a highly responsive and controllable cooking method with a range of convenient features.

The Lincat induction hob typically offers 90% efficiency as compared with a solid electric hotplate at 55% and a gas hob at 50%. Because heat is generated in the pan, instead of the hob surface, very little energy is wasted into the kitchen’s atmosphere, which makes the cooking process more efficient and reduces demand on air conditioning systems. At the same time Lincat’s new induction hob delivers rapid heat-up and almost twice the cooking power of a similarly rated gas hob.

Other features include rotary controls with LED power level display, a pan detection safety function, easy-to-change filter and a powerful internal cooling fan with overheat protection. Its impact-resistant Scott Ceran® glass ceramic surface is hard-wearing and easy to clean, particularly as the induction process keeps the surface relatively cool.

Nick McDonald, Marketing Director of Lincat Ltd, said:

“Ideal for melting chocolate, simmering stocks or rapidly boiling a large pan of pasta, our new IH21 induction hob will help businesses to reduce energy consumption, cut costs and increase safety in the kitchen. Equal to the challenges of the busiest commercial kitchen, the IH21 is also a great choice for front of house or theatre style cooking, thanks to its attractive design and sleek profile.”

Lincat Ltd manufactures one of the world’s most comprehensive ranges of catering equipment. Lincat Ltd is a member company of the Middleby Corporation.

The Lincat IH21 is available from www.busychef.co.uk for £527.00 plus VAT with free delivery.

Busychef is the online trading arm of YCE Catering Equipment Ltd based in Leeds, Yorkshire. At Busychef we offer leading brands of catering equipment with an excellent service and unsurpassed knowledge of the foodservice industry at internet prices.

With thanks to Lincat.

What to Consider When Buying Restaurant Equipment

If you are thinking about opening your own restaurant, buying commercial catering equipment will surely be a top priority. Purchasing such equipment is quite different from buying it for your kitchen at home. Making the right choices is imperative, as they will pave the way for your future success. The following tips might help you in devising a strategy on how to proceed.

Consider Your Budget

Starting up a restaurant is expensive. You have to employ kitchen and waiting staff as well as pay for licences, food, rent, utilities and advertising. No restaurant can go without equipment, hence it deserves special attention. It is the foundation for future growth. But there are ways of equipping your kitchen with everything you need without going bust.

Having gas available in the building is one way of saving money from the outset without reducing quality. If you prefer electric, then you should try getting three-phase into your restaurant kitchen. Three-phase wiring lowers the kilowatt hours used and cuts your electricity bill. Another factor when deciding between electric or gas is efficiency and maintenance cost. Electric equipment is usually more efficient but it contains more moving parts and so repairs are costlier.

Furthermore, there are different levels of quality equipment within the above categories. Depending on how much money you have available you can opt for different classes for the different items you will buy.

Consider your Space

Considering your space and arranging all the equipment properly is vital for the efficient functioning of your kitchen.

Talk to a commercial kitchen designer to devise an optimal kitchen layout so that it creates nice flow throughout the cooking process. A  good kitchen plan is where all your equipment fits in and is easily accessible to the kitchen staff when needed. Therefore, don’t overbuy equipment.
It is better for a kitchen to be compact instead of having useless items standing in the way. Consulting an electrician is important. If you are using an older building for your restaurant, you have to ensure it can supply all the electricity needed. In summer, for example, refrigeration equipment and ice machines work harder to keep cool and can overheat, which can cause electrical outages.  The electrician will be able to help once the layout is decided to make sure the right power is available to the equipment pieces.
                                                                                                                                                                            Consider What You Need

This brings us to prioritising your purchases. Some equipment is indispensable. Other items can be purchased later, on or can even be leased. Once you know your budget you can list all the equipment you want on a sliding scale of necessity. The importance of equipment is determined by how often a specific item will be used. You should consider whether the kitchen could survive without a particular piece for a day or several days. Naturally, the more crucial a piece is, the more you should opt for quality.

A chef’s input before you go shopping is beneficial. Depending on the type of your restaurant, a chef might be able to give you some good advice about what’s important and what can wait. You should also consult an electrician about a good kitchen plan that houses all your equipment neatly and is readily accessible to staff.

Finally, you might want to consult your local environmental health officer, fire service and building inspector before you buy anything. They can usually provide you with a spec sheet on what is allowed into a commercial kitchen.

Do Your Research

Proper research and planning is maybe the most important part of the process. This can save you hassle later on. Compare the different items, set priorities, consult relevant specialists and keep your vision in mind. With all of this in check, you are well on your way to creating a kitchen which will work wonders.

Spacious and Clean Commercial Kitchen

YCE Catering Equipment Ltd are based in Leeds, Yorkshire and has built up a reputation as a respected catering equipment company serving the hospitality, leisure, public and private sectors throughout the UK.

Busychef is the online sales showroom for YCE Catering Equipment Ltd.

 

Commercial Kitchen Design Tips

 

restaurant-kitchenWhatever the style of kitchen, the general rule is that the larger the operation, the more services and facets have to be considered.

The three prime considerations that dictate kitchen design are:

  • Service requirement: Consider the service the kitchen has to provide – for instance, the numbers being served, is it an la carte menu, plated service, self-service, cafeteria-style, etc?
  • Space available: Is the space allocated sufficient to fit in the equipment required?
  • Budget: Always have an accurate idea of spend available.

The design process should never progress without a clear understanding of these considerations, which should then be structured around the need to provide the required service, while satisfying the basic codes of practice of food hygiene and handling and complying with statutory legislation.

Always carry out a risk assessment of any design to identify any shortfalls – for instance, the need to keep the food preparation area separate from the rest of the kitchen to negate the risk of cross-contamination.

Any design should incorporate good workflow patterns and ergonomic solutions to building constraints, so the following criteria should be considered:

Delivery

  • Ensure goods vehicles have adequate access to the premises, providing direct deliveries to the catering area. Provide adequate space to allow a goods check-in area before entering the kitchen.
  • Where possible, bulk storage should be close to the goods-in area so there’s no need for delivery personnel to enter the kitchen and food preparation area. Never underestimate the need to allow adequate space for dry, chilled and frozen goods. Many suppliers have minimum drop requirements.

Preparation

  • Position main preparation between bulk storage and the cooking process, to ensure the correct flow pattern. Where possible, different processes should be segregated – ie, raw meat and fish separate from prepared foods. If necessary, consider chilled preparation areas for high-risk food environments. In smaller establishments where segregation is not possible, stringent regimes must be employed to ensure segregation of processes, so that utensils and tables are suitably sanitised between processes. In addition, consider adequate refrigerated storage for prepared food.
  • Provide adequate prep sinks, separate pot-wash sinks and hand-wash facilities.

Cooking

  • When selecting cooking equipment, consider the requirements of the menu and the ability of the staff using the equipment. Although state-of-the-art equipment such as programmable combi-ovens, pressure bratt pans and computerised deep-fat fryers may be nice to have, they may not always be appropriate for the style and content of some menus. Conversely, never underestimate the benefits that hi-tech equipment can provide, in terms of cost control, and energy and labour savings.
  • Workflows and safety should be the prime drivers in the layout of a professional kitchen. Simple things include ensuring there’s a set-down space next to deep-fat fryers, never siting a fryer at the end of a run, and always allowing a minimum of 900mm corridor to the front of any cooking equipment, although 1,200mm is ideal.
  • Ensure the flow of the cooking suite suits the style of service, with fast-cook equipment such as fryers, salamanders and griddles nearest to the point of service and bulk cooking kit such as bratt pans, convection ovens and boiling pans further away.
  • Consideration should also be given to the mechanical and electrical services available. Sometimes it’s not possible to get gas into a building, or you may be restricted by the size of the incoming electrical supply.KitchenCookingArea

Food Service Area

  • The space requirement for service is often underestimated, particularly by architects. Whether the operation is waited service or tray-line style, you can minimise queuing by the provision of multi pick-up and service points. Consider adequate space for hot and cold holding of prepared food ready for service. If it’s a large site, counters may need to be replenished several times during a service period. In an la carte restaurant, allow sufficient space for plating up and hot pass. Where possible, locate the service point close to the final cooking process to avoid double handling.

Wash-up

  • Nearly always undersized by space planners, the dishwashing operation is key to the success of any catering establishment. If it fails through inefficient planning, the restaurant cannot function. To determine the space required, the capacity of dishwasher and the amount of ancillary sorting space, calculate the number of crockery, cutlery and hollow-ware items (don’t forget trays) to be used during a service period. All reputable dishwasher manufacturers can help you with this calculation and provide you with the correct size system and machine. Remember to allow sufficient space for the storage of clean items and the disposal of rubbish, ensuring the two are segregated to avoid cross-contamination.
  • Location is paramount to the efficient management of the space. Ideally it should be close to both the restaurant and service area to avoid double handling.
  • The amount of steam and moist air produced is often underestimated. If possible, consult a ventilation engineer.

Refuse

  • Always allow for a clearly defined route for dirty dishes that won’t conflict with preparation and service areas. Consider the location of an outside refuse bay, well away from the kitchen entrance.
    Staff facilities
  • Ensure that appropriately located and sized facilities for staff changing and locker areas and staff toilets are available near the kitchen.

Environmental

  • Consider energy efficiency of all equipment, as fuel costs are now higher than ever. Also, consider volumes of water used and research your product; many major manufacturers use energy efficiency as their USPs.
  • Consider any “green” policies, allow for recycling of bottles, aluminium, plastic and paper. If possible, have a recycling area.
  • Ensure correct ventilation and air replacement are available in all areas. Consult an engineer to ensure you comply with the minimum requirements of the local authority’s clean air policy.
  • Ensure lighting provides at least the minimum requirement of 500 lux at worktop height.
  • Invite your local EHO to view your plans and pass comment. It’s always best to get them on your side at the outset.

Building fabric

  • Ensure floors (non-slip), walls and ceilings can be cleaned and maintained easily.
    And remember, almost all designs are a compromise. A good design is one that best suits the constraint of space and budget without detrimental effect on service.

Ask busyCHEF to design your dream kitchen – whether a restaurant or tea room, pub or coffee shop – advice is free! Call Ian Canavan on Freephone 0500 008075.

Fancy a brew? Just push the button

EB3F-PBReady to dispense piping hot, filtered water at the push of a button, the Lincat popular EB3F water boiler is now also available with a safe, convenient push-button mechanism. Combined with striking good looks, the boiler is perfect for front-of-house and self-service operations.

FilterFlow automatic water boilers are among Lincat’s most popular products, not only for their versatility and efficiency, but also because of Lincat’s unique, built-in water filtration.

What’s the big deal about built-in filtration? Well firstly, you need to filter out impurities from tap water to create a better-tasting, “cleaner” hot drink, as well as removing any strange odours that can come from unfiltered water heated to a high temperature. Filtration also dramatically reduces the build-up of scale in the boiler, which means the unit lasts longer, works better, and can go for longer without repairs.

It’s easy to see why many caterers wouldn’t bother with filtered water, as most boilers require a separate, plumbed-in filtration unit, which needs to be professionally fitted, maintained and replaced. FilterFlow does away with all that – the low-cost cartridges are part of the boiler unit itself, and replacing one (about every six months) is as easy as changing a lightbulb.

The new push-button EB3F/PB produces up to 31 litres of premium-quality filtered water per hour. Like other FilterFlow models, the new boiler gives you precise control over the temperature of the water, while a diagnostic panels lets you know how the boiler is operating and when to change the filter.

If you’d like to know more, fetch a cup of tea and check out the busyCHEF deal on the EB3F/PB here – £423 plus VAT including delivery.

With thanks to Lincat for the detailed information – also check out www.filterflow.co.uk for more facts on the Lincat FilterFlow Automatic Boilers.

Doenload the FliterFlow brochure here and the FilterFlow Push Button brochure here.

Visit www.busychef.co.uk for the very best deals on food service equipment online.

Lincat launches Giga® Fast Oven

Lincat, the UK’s leading manufacturer of catering equipment, has launched the Giga® Fast Oven, a versatile, compact counter-top oven that can cook a fresh dough pizza in 90 seconds.

The secret to the speed lies within the unique airflow cylinders that intensely focus hot air to deliver exceptionally rapid cooking. The Giga® Fast Oven heats up to 400/450°C in as little as 10 minutes, and features an easy to use temperature control and cooking timer for consistent, repeatable results.

Designed to provide bars, pubs and restaurants with the ability to serve authentic Italian Pizza without having to invest in expensive specialist equipment or staff training, it delivers comparable results to a traditional wood-fired oven.

If pizza isn’t the only thing on the menu, the Giga® Fast Oven can also be quickly converted into a standard convection oven for the cooking of lasagne, croissants, cakes, pies, pastries, potatoes and oven chips, as well as for the toasting of all types of bread products.

Nick McDonald, Marketing Director of Lincat, said:

“The Giga® Fast Oven combines the performance of a dedicated wood-fired pizza oven with the versatility of a convection oven in a single, compact package. And since it operates from a standard 13amp plug it can be used anywhere.

“This will allow any outlet, even one that doesn’t already have a kitchen, to produce tasty, authentic pizzas without the need to invest in additional appliances, specialist staff or training. We think it will prove particularly popular with pubs looking for a cost-effective way to improve their food offering and supplement their wet sales.

He added…

“With the potential to produce up to 30 pizzas an hour, the Giga® Fast Oven will pay for itself in no time, and provide a fantastic long term return on your investment.”

Powerful, energy efficient and easy to use, the Giga® Fast Oven also features include switchable internal illumination, making it ideal for front-of-house use. Like all Lincat products, it is supplied with a two year onsite parts and labour warranty.

Lincat Ltd manufactures one of the world’s most comprehensive ranges of catering equipment. Products are sold in the UK and in over 50 countries worldwide through a comprehensive network of distributors. Lincat Ltd is a member company of the Middleby Corporation.

Tha Lincat Giga® Fast Oven is available from YCE Catering Equipment via their online busyCHEF webshop here and costs £1,188.00 plus VAT.

Healthy Chips?

Busychef would like to thank Paul Hickman Development Chef at Lincat for the his contribution to our blog.

I was recently asked by a journalist whether the widespread desire to offer ‘healthy food’ by cost sector kitchens has rung the death knell for everyone’s favourite – the ultimate comfort food – the chip!

My thoughts on the subject are that whereas a few years ago commercial fryers were starting to be left out of new cost sector kitchens and refits, they’re now beginning to make a comeback.

I think that’s because there’s a greater understanding that what counts, when it comes to healthy eating, is a balanced diet. And fried foods can form part of that healthy eating programme.

It’s true too, especially in healthcare settings, that ‘a bit of what you fancy does you good’. Good nutrition is essential to recovery and, if you can tempt patients to eat with well cooked, familiar food then there are real benefits to be had at every level.

People are also beginning to adopt healthier frying methods. The traditional way to cook chips for example would be to blanch them in the fryer at the relatively low temperature of 160 deg C before chilling them down and storing them until needed. Then the chips would be fried again at a higher temperature prior to service.

Now, many chefs are choosing to steam their chips prior to frying. This allows the chips to be fried just once, in hotter oil. This reduces the quantity of oil which is absorbed by the potato and therefore produces a healthier, less fatty chip.

In order to prepare chips in this way you need to invest in a powerful fryer, which is capable of achieving the high temperature you need (180 deg C) when fully loaded.

This will seal the surface of the potato and allow the interior to be ‘steamed’. Here are one or two other ways to produce ‘healthier’ chips:

  • Serve large, fat chips rather than thin ones. This will reduce fat absorption.
  • Allow chips and other fried products to drain prior to serving – choose a fryer therefore which has sturdy, free-draining frying baskets.
  • Consider using a chip scuttle to hold fried food for a short time prior to serving. This will allow excess fat to drain away.
  • Always use good quality vegetable oil and filter frequently.
  • Make sure that your fryer is powerful enough to meet your needs. Fast heat recovery times are essential. If a fryer is unable achieve the optimum chip cooking temperature quickly, the chances are that the cooking process will be extended with the result that the chips will absorb more fat.
  • Buy a fryer which is big enough for your business. If your fryer is too small, the temptation is to overload the basket, which will result in extended cooking times and greater fat absorption.
  • Buy a well designed and constructed fryer from a reputable manufacturer. Good manufacturers will provide accurate information about optimum batch sizes, capacities, recovery times and overall performance.

In addition to concerns about health and nutrition, cost sector caterers are also worried about the rising cost of food and are aware of the need to reduce waste and minimise their impact on the environment. Extending the life of cooking oil is one of the key ways in which this can be achieved. As a result, fryers such as our Opus 700 models with built-in filtration, which are designed to extend the life of cooking oil by up to 75%, are proving popular at this time.

You can find out more about Lincat fryers by following this link: http://www.lincat.co.uk/products, and you can see the fryers in action at our Leeds test kitchen here.

Keeping The Nation’s Dishes Sparkling Clean

Busychef are grateful to Nick Burridge, Director of Sales at Classeq for his insight into ware washing manufacturer Classeq. The Classeq range of dishwashers and glasswashers are available at busychef.co.uk or by clicking here.
Classeq began life as a family firm back in 1977 and has gone from strength to strength, producing their core products, commercial warewashers here in the UK ever since.
As Nick Burridge, Director of Sales at Classeq explains, “We have always had a great workforce who we can rely on to produce the goods in the United Kingdom and one of the best things about manufacturing here in Staffordshire is that we are able to keep any eye on all aspects of the manufacturing process to ensure that we produce quality products and have a close cooperation with R&D.  We are truly proud to be a manufacturer in the UK today.”
Classeq manufacture a wide range of dishwashers and glasswashers for use across the hospitality sector with machines widely used in schools, restaurants, bars, clubs and cafes and so forth.
As Nick explains, “With such a wide range of products we are able to cater for the needs of establishments of all sizes and working through our distributor network are able to source the right machine for each and every venue.”
“Our machines perform well, look smart, use relatively low levels of energy to help keep costs down, are reliable and give great value for money all  supported by our distributors and after sales team too, ensuring excellent back-up and technical service.”
Classeq’s glasswashers and dishwashers are available in a variety of sizes, ideal for small, medium and large scale operations.  The Duo 400 is the smallest front-loading dishwasher and is perfect for the smaller outlet that still want to reap the benefits of having a commercial machine being small, affordable and running at only three minutes per cycle.
At the other end of the scale, the Alto 280 rack dishwasher is aimed at larger establishments which have greater quantities of crockery and dishes to clean, coping with 280 racks per hour whilst only using one litre of water per rack due to its unique operating system.
As Nick concludes, “Classeq provide the affordable warewashing solutions for business across the spectrum and because the machines are made in Britain, there is the knowledge that you are buying British and helping the UK economy too.  We are proud of our role in keeping the nation’s dishes sparkling clean!”
Look at the busyCHEF range of dishwashers here. We are pleased to stock the Classeq range of dishwashers and glasswashers. Classeq manufacture a wide range of dishwashers and glasswashers for use across the hospitality sector with machines widely used in schools, restaurants, bars, clubs and cafes.

 

First Impressions Count…………..

There’s no doubt about it, beautifully prepared food, attractively displayed, can prove to be irresistible. So choosing the right servery and food display equipment is a key issue for any catering business.

The choice however can be bewildering, with a vast array of manufacturers and models available – offering heated, ambient and refrigerated solutions. Here are some general guidelines and points to consider…

First and foremost you should always choose a reputable manufacturer to be sure of compliance with all relevant regulations, and to ensure ongoing service and spare parts availability.

Another sound piece of advice is to think about your future needs as well as your present needs. Try to buy the best unit that funds will allow, providing you with extra capacity as your business expands.

But what else should you look for?

 

  • Ensure that units look stylish and modern, especially if they will not be fully stocked all the time. However, the design should not detract from the products you are trying to display.

 

  • On refrigerated units, ensure that temperatures meet all food legislation requirements and that they have automatic defrost and water evaporation functions. Good units should have a digital temperature display to enable you to check the cabinet temperatures.

 

  • Heated units should have good heat distribution and may have a humidifying feature to prevent foods drying out.

 

  • Consider the layout of the units; for example, you may need to specify self-service or back service options. Refrigerated units may offer a choice of compressor on the left or right or even attached to the underside, out of sight; they should not be too loud or generate too much heat.

 

  • Units should be easy to clean at the end of the day without any hidden dirt, crumb or water traps.

 

  • The back service units should have double glazed glass to the rear to help retain heat within the cabinet.

 

  • Does the unit have internal illumination to show your products off to their best advantage?

 

  • Finally, you can always talk to us at busychef.co.uk! We offer the benefit of 30+ years in the foodservice industry,  and will visit you on site to see how the unit will be used.

With thanks to Lincat for their advice. We recommend Lincat Seal merchandisers and you can view the full range here at busychef.co.uk.

Holding And Warming Equipment – What’s The Difference?

Holding and Warming Equipment are essential to any foodservice operation, as they keep food hot and fresh during waiting times. There are many types of holding and warming equipment to choose from, so it’s important to find one that fits your operation. You need the correct type of warming equipment to make sure that foods are at a safe and hot temperature when taken to a customer’s table. How will you know what type of equipment is perfect for your foodservice operation? Keep reading to find out!

Drawer Warmers

Drawer Warmer

Drawer warmers ensure that foods arrive not only hot, but also at a safe temperature. Many drawer warmers let you control what temperature you’d like the food to be held at. Some warmers even let you control a different temperature for each drawer, such as if you need meat to be held above 63°C and mashed potato held at 72°C.

Heated Holding Cabinets

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Heated Holding Cabinets are taller than drawer warmers, and most come with castors so you can easily move the cabinet throughout your kitchen and restaurant. These cabinets can hold a variety of gastronorm containers and shelving, depending on which model you purchase. Heated holding cabinets also retain the quality your food, whilst keeping your food at a safe temperature! Easily control these cabinets by selecting the perfect temperature.

Food Warmers or Bains Marie

200-062

Food Warmers are sometimes also called Bains Marie, but are essentially the same thing. These warmers usually sit on a countertop or within a food servery. You can keep warm a variety of foods with these units, depending on the type you purchase. Overhead food warmers have pre-focused heat that maintains serving temperatures longer without continuing to cook the food. An example of this would be a chip scuttle.

Heat Lamps

269-308

Heat Lamps are very similar to overhead food warmers. They use bulbs or lamps to heat your food to maintain a safe temperature. Depending on the model type, some heat lamps can heat from above and underneath your food.

Hot Food Display Cases

These display cases keep wrapped products at foodsafe temperatures, and allow for easy dispensing or self-service. Busychef has hot food display cases that hold a variety of foods, such as burgers, soup, pizza and more.200-110

Heated Shelves

Heated shelves are ideal for pass through areas, servery counters or can be used as a heated work shelf. These shelves sometimes have an adjustable thermostat  and are easy to clean. Busychef has a wide selection of heated shelves so you can find the one that will fit your foodservice operation the best.

Soup Warmers/Kettles

870-011

Soup kettles allow you to adjust the temperature and cook and hold your soup all in one. Soup Kettles can be used in the kitchen, or in a buffet line for self service. Busychef has soup merchandisers that not only hold and cook your soup, but also provide an attractive display to attract customers’ attention.

Rice Cookers

815-064

Want a way to easily cook rice in large quantities? Rice Cookers not only allow you to easily cook rice, some models can also cook oatmeal, grits or liquids. The removable, nonstick pot is easy to clean and includes a moisture cup to collect water to prevent dripping on the counter.

Still Need Help?

If you’re still stuck on which piece of holding and warming equipment is right for your foodservice operation, give Busychef a call on free phone 0500 008 075. One of our sales team will gladly help you out with your needs!

See more at www.busychef.co.uk