Top 10 Tips for Catering Equipment Maintenance

fireTop 10 Tips for Catering Equipment Maintenance

The only way to get the most benefit and trouble-free service out of your catering and refrigeration equipment is to perform regular maintenance. Regular maintenance, which includes cleaning, will keep everything working in good working order and can catch minor problems or worn out parts before they cause expensive breakdowns. Regardless of the type of equipment, there are 10 maintenance related tasks that you need to do for every piece of catering equipment that you own.

Read The Manual!

The first place you should look for proper maintenance procedures for your specific pieces of catering equipment is the owner’s manual, which comes with the equipment. Generalised tips from an article on the internet are all well and good, but the owner’s manual will tell you specifically what needs to be done to keep your equipment in tip-top shape. Most manufacturers’ websites have downloadable versions of manuals, and the manufacturers should have manuals for older or discontinued models, too.

Fill Out and Return the Warranty Card

The only way to gain the benefits of manufacturers’ warranties for new catering or refrigeration equipment, which usually include x-number of years in free parts and labour, is to fill out the warranty card and return it to the manufacturer. You usually have about a month after delivery to get the warranty card filled out and returned, so don’t put it off.

Educate staff on the proper use of the equipment.

Misuse and abuse are among the leading causes of catering equipment breakdowns, and most warranties will not cover repairs resulting from misuse. Show staff how to properly use, clean and maintain your foodservice equipment to keep everything up and running and eliminate the amount of money you have to spend on non-warranty issues.

Clean all catering equipment daily.

Daily cleaning is perhaps the most important maintenance tip for catering and refrigeration equipment. Daily cleaning prevents dirt, grime and food scraps from building up and causing damage to the machine’s components. Having clean catering equipment is something environmental health officers look for too. Learn more here about what EHO’s look for

a9feaa6c206_634x404Perform thorough cleaning on a regular basis.

Either weekly, monthly or half yearly, depending on the type of equipment, there are deep cleaning procedures that need to be followed. The purpose of more thorough cleaning is to get those places that are hard to reach or to just tackle the grime that accumulates over time.

Regularly inspect your catering equipment.

Any time you perform a thorough cleaning on your catering equipment, inspect any moving parts, electrical, water and gas connections and other components for wear, tear and leaks. Catching and correcting small maintenance issues early (like a water leak caused by a loose hose fitting) can save you from more expensive repairs in the future. You can even set up a service contract with a local service agent and have them inspect your equipment. Try us out at YCE Catering Equipment Ltd by phoning 0113 252 6566 or email service@yce.co.uk.

Replace broken or worn out parts.

Over time, parts just wear out and need to be replaced. If something appears worn out, better to replace the worn out part soon before it causes serious problems. Contact a member of our service team at YCE Catering Equipment Ltd by phoning 0113 252 6566 or email service@yce.co.uk.

tumblr_inline_mi812zliar1qz4rgpBe careful with DIY fixes. 

One way to save money on catering equipment or refrigeration repairs is to simply fix it yourself. If the equipment is new, fixing things yourself may void the warranty, so be sure to read the warranty and know what you can and cannot do yourself. Even if the equipment is not under warranty, overly complex repairs should still be performed by someone with the right skills and qualifications – not some guy the boss met down the pub. Don’t slow down your wait time with unreliable equipment.

Follow chemical instructions.

Whether the chemicals you are using are meant to clean the piece of equipment or the equipment uses chemicals itself, like a commercial dishwasher, be sure to read and follow the instructions on the labels. Improperly mixing to the wrong chemical concentration can be dangerous for your staff and damaging to your equipment.

undersinkcloseProperly care for stainless steel.

Catering equipment and refrigeration is manufactured primarily out of stainless steel. Despite its name, stainless steel can become stained, tarnished or corroded if not properly cared for, so be sure to use mild detergents, soft cloths and wash with the grain when cleaning your food service equipment.

If you would like advice from the experts on looking after your catering equipment, please get in touch with the Busychef team on 0500 008075 or email sales@busychef.co.uk. We have been giving good advice for a very long time.

When your deep fat fryer stops working…………

Just about to start service, switch on the fryers at the wall or try to fire up the burners and the nothing happens? Kitchen nightmare indeed! Imagine running just one service without a deep fat fryer!

What do you do next? Call an engineer – maybe – but will your favourite kitchen equipment engineer really be able to get to you in five minutes?angry boss

Do you have an on-site maintenance engineer? Even if he can get to the kitchen quickly, does he know what to do?

This is worth a shot – read on.

Before service started were the fryers cleaned out? Was the old oil changed for new? Has someone simply pulled the fryers out to clean behind them? All of the above actions can result in the overheat, safety or reset switch becoming activated, or trigger the fryer head location microswitch (sounds it techy but it’s not).

The fryer head location microswitch is the easiest fix – just looking at the fryer you will be able to see whether the head is sitting squarely onto the tank. If not, just relocate it as it should be, and the fryer should start up. There is no resetting of a microswitch – its just there to make sure the elements are sitting in the oil and this type of safety device is usually found on small table top electric fryers.

Now to the overheat or reset safety switch and the most likely cause for it to trip out:

When emptying your deep fat fryers, whether gas or electric, we all know it is easier to drain the oil when it is warm. The oil is less viscous – thinner – and runs away easier. Don’t try emptying the fryer of oil when it is still hot as that is dangerous and could result in a fire or worse.

The Hot Off the Grill restaurant in Seal Beach is closed on Saturday due to a grease and oil fire that happened Friday evening.  ////ADDITIONAL INFO:  -   02.SB.fire.0426.ks   -  Day: Saturday - Date: 4/25/15  -  Time: 9:56:14 AM  -   Original file name: _KSA3642.NEF  -  KEN STEINHARDT, ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER --

When draining warm oil from the fryer tank, the fryer heating element or gas burner tube is exposed whilst the fryer is still warm, and these areas can actually still increase in temperature as the oil absorbs any left over heat once the fryers have been switched off.

Remove the oil (the heat absorbing load if you like) and the metal components can no longer dissipate the latent heat through the oil so they heat up.

This can result in the overheat thermostat being activated, which is why your fryer won’t switch on. Have a look at this really helpful video from our friends at Lincat. Don’t worry if your fryer isn’t made by Lincat, and the neon lights on your fryer may not be the same colours – the remedy is just the same as soon as you have found out where the switch is hidden! Now where did you put the fryer instructions?

Easy – right? Well we hope so, but there is a chance of course that this fix doesn’t get your fryer working again. The overheat switch may reset, but it might activate again either immediately or soon after resetting. In this case, as John says in the video, you may have an underlying fault within the fryer that your service engineer will need to check. Under no circumstances tape the reset button down or ask your KP to keep his/her finger on it until service ends. It’s there for a reason!

To see the full range of electric and gas deep fat fryers on the Busychef website click here.df7

The Busychef and YCE Catering Equipment Ltd team would like to thank Lincat Ltd and  their Product Support Manager John Quipp for the above video.

If you do need service support, then contact YCE Catering Equipment service line on 0113 252 6566 or email: service@yce.co.uk

Commercial Kitchen Design Tips

 

restaurant-kitchenWhatever the style of kitchen, the general rule is that the larger the operation, the more services and facets have to be considered.

The three prime considerations that dictate kitchen design are:

  • Service requirement: Consider the service the kitchen has to provide – for instance, the numbers being served, is it an la carte menu, plated service, self-service, cafeteria-style, etc?
  • Space available: Is the space allocated sufficient to fit in the equipment required?
  • Budget: Always have an accurate idea of spend available.

The design process should never progress without a clear understanding of these considerations, which should then be structured around the need to provide the required service, while satisfying the basic codes of practice of food hygiene and handling and complying with statutory legislation.

Always carry out a risk assessment of any design to identify any shortfalls – for instance, the need to keep the food preparation area separate from the rest of the kitchen to negate the risk of cross-contamination.

Any design should incorporate good workflow patterns and ergonomic solutions to building constraints, so the following criteria should be considered:

Delivery

  • Ensure goods vehicles have adequate access to the premises, providing direct deliveries to the catering area. Provide adequate space to allow a goods check-in area before entering the kitchen.
  • Where possible, bulk storage should be close to the goods-in area so there’s no need for delivery personnel to enter the kitchen and food preparation area. Never underestimate the need to allow adequate space for dry, chilled and frozen goods. Many suppliers have minimum drop requirements.

Preparation

  • Position main preparation between bulk storage and the cooking process, to ensure the correct flow pattern. Where possible, different processes should be segregated – ie, raw meat and fish separate from prepared foods. If necessary, consider chilled preparation areas for high-risk food environments. In smaller establishments where segregation is not possible, stringent regimes must be employed to ensure segregation of processes, so that utensils and tables are suitably sanitised between processes. In addition, consider adequate refrigerated storage for prepared food.
  • Provide adequate prep sinks, separate pot-wash sinks and hand-wash facilities.

Cooking

  • When selecting cooking equipment, consider the requirements of the menu and the ability of the staff using the equipment. Although state-of-the-art equipment such as programmable combi-ovens, pressure bratt pans and computerised deep-fat fryers may be nice to have, they may not always be appropriate for the style and content of some menus. Conversely, never underestimate the benefits that hi-tech equipment can provide, in terms of cost control, and energy and labour savings.
  • Workflows and safety should be the prime drivers in the layout of a professional kitchen. Simple things include ensuring there’s a set-down space next to deep-fat fryers, never siting a fryer at the end of a run, and always allowing a minimum of 900mm corridor to the front of any cooking equipment, although 1,200mm is ideal.
  • Ensure the flow of the cooking suite suits the style of service, with fast-cook equipment such as fryers, salamanders and griddles nearest to the point of service and bulk cooking kit such as bratt pans, convection ovens and boiling pans further away.
  • Consideration should also be given to the mechanical and electrical services available. Sometimes it’s not possible to get gas into a building, or you may be restricted by the size of the incoming electrical supply.KitchenCookingArea

Food Service Area

  • The space requirement for service is often underestimated, particularly by architects. Whether the operation is waited service or tray-line style, you can minimise queuing by the provision of multi pick-up and service points. Consider adequate space for hot and cold holding of prepared food ready for service. If it’s a large site, counters may need to be replenished several times during a service period. In an la carte restaurant, allow sufficient space for plating up and hot pass. Where possible, locate the service point close to the final cooking process to avoid double handling.

Wash-up

  • Nearly always undersized by space planners, the dishwashing operation is key to the success of any catering establishment. If it fails through inefficient planning, the restaurant cannot function. To determine the space required, the capacity of dishwasher and the amount of ancillary sorting space, calculate the number of crockery, cutlery and hollow-ware items (don’t forget trays) to be used during a service period. All reputable dishwasher manufacturers can help you with this calculation and provide you with the correct size system and machine. Remember to allow sufficient space for the storage of clean items and the disposal of rubbish, ensuring the two are segregated to avoid cross-contamination.
  • Location is paramount to the efficient management of the space. Ideally it should be close to both the restaurant and service area to avoid double handling.
  • The amount of steam and moist air produced is often underestimated. If possible, consult a ventilation engineer.

Refuse

  • Always allow for a clearly defined route for dirty dishes that won’t conflict with preparation and service areas. Consider the location of an outside refuse bay, well away from the kitchen entrance.
    Staff facilities
  • Ensure that appropriately located and sized facilities for staff changing and locker areas and staff toilets are available near the kitchen.

Environmental

  • Consider energy efficiency of all equipment, as fuel costs are now higher than ever. Also, consider volumes of water used and research your product; many major manufacturers use energy efficiency as their USPs.
  • Consider any “green” policies, allow for recycling of bottles, aluminium, plastic and paper. If possible, have a recycling area.
  • Ensure correct ventilation and air replacement are available in all areas. Consult an engineer to ensure you comply with the minimum requirements of the local authority’s clean air policy.
  • Ensure lighting provides at least the minimum requirement of 500 lux at worktop height.
  • Invite your local EHO to view your plans and pass comment. It’s always best to get them on your side at the outset.

Building fabric

  • Ensure floors (non-slip), walls and ceilings can be cleaned and maintained easily.
    And remember, almost all designs are a compromise. A good design is one that best suits the constraint of space and budget without detrimental effect on service.

Ask busyCHEF to design your dream kitchen – whether a restaurant or tea room, pub or coffee shop – advice is free! Call Ian Canavan on Freephone 0500 008075.

First Impressions Count…………..

There’s no doubt about it, beautifully prepared food, attractively displayed, can prove to be irresistible. So choosing the right servery and food display equipment is a key issue for any catering business.

The choice however can be bewildering, with a vast array of manufacturers and models available – offering heated, ambient and refrigerated solutions. Here are some general guidelines and points to consider…

First and foremost you should always choose a reputable manufacturer to be sure of compliance with all relevant regulations, and to ensure ongoing service and spare parts availability.

Another sound piece of advice is to think about your future needs as well as your present needs. Try to buy the best unit that funds will allow, providing you with extra capacity as your business expands.

But what else should you look for?

 

  • Ensure that units look stylish and modern, especially if they will not be fully stocked all the time. However, the design should not detract from the products you are trying to display.

 

  • On refrigerated units, ensure that temperatures meet all food legislation requirements and that they have automatic defrost and water evaporation functions. Good units should have a digital temperature display to enable you to check the cabinet temperatures.

 

  • Heated units should have good heat distribution and may have a humidifying feature to prevent foods drying out.

 

  • Consider the layout of the units; for example, you may need to specify self-service or back service options. Refrigerated units may offer a choice of compressor on the left or right or even attached to the underside, out of sight; they should not be too loud or generate too much heat.

 

  • Units should be easy to clean at the end of the day without any hidden dirt, crumb or water traps.

 

  • The back service units should have double glazed glass to the rear to help retain heat within the cabinet.

 

  • Does the unit have internal illumination to show your products off to their best advantage?

 

  • Finally, you can always talk to us at busychef.co.uk! We offer the benefit of 30+ years in the foodservice industry,  and will visit you on site to see how the unit will be used.

With thanks to Lincat for their advice. We recommend Lincat Seal merchandisers and you can view the full range here at busychef.co.uk.

Holding And Warming Equipment – What’s The Difference?

Holding and Warming Equipment are essential to any foodservice operation, as they keep food hot and fresh during waiting times. There are many types of holding and warming equipment to choose from, so it’s important to find one that fits your operation. You need the correct type of warming equipment to make sure that foods are at a safe and hot temperature when taken to a customer’s table. How will you know what type of equipment is perfect for your foodservice operation? Keep reading to find out!

Drawer Warmers

Drawer Warmer

Drawer warmers ensure that foods arrive not only hot, but also at a safe temperature. Many drawer warmers let you control what temperature you’d like the food to be held at. Some warmers even let you control a different temperature for each drawer, such as if you need meat to be held above 63°C and mashed potato held at 72°C.

Heated Holding Cabinets

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Heated Holding Cabinets are taller than drawer warmers, and most come with castors so you can easily move the cabinet throughout your kitchen and restaurant. These cabinets can hold a variety of gastronorm containers and shelving, depending on which model you purchase. Heated holding cabinets also retain the quality your food, whilst keeping your food at a safe temperature! Easily control these cabinets by selecting the perfect temperature.

Food Warmers or Bains Marie

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Food Warmers are sometimes also called Bains Marie, but are essentially the same thing. These warmers usually sit on a countertop or within a food servery. You can keep warm a variety of foods with these units, depending on the type you purchase. Overhead food warmers have pre-focused heat that maintains serving temperatures longer without continuing to cook the food. An example of this would be a chip scuttle.

Heat Lamps

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Heat Lamps are very similar to overhead food warmers. They use bulbs or lamps to heat your food to maintain a safe temperature. Depending on the model type, some heat lamps can heat from above and underneath your food.

Hot Food Display Cases

These display cases keep wrapped products at foodsafe temperatures, and allow for easy dispensing or self-service. Busychef has hot food display cases that hold a variety of foods, such as burgers, soup, pizza and more.200-110

Heated Shelves

Heated shelves are ideal for pass through areas, servery counters or can be used as a heated work shelf. These shelves sometimes have an adjustable thermostat  and are easy to clean. Busychef has a wide selection of heated shelves so you can find the one that will fit your foodservice operation the best.

Soup Warmers/Kettles

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Soup kettles allow you to adjust the temperature and cook and hold your soup all in one. Soup Kettles can be used in the kitchen, or in a buffet line for self service. Busychef has soup merchandisers that not only hold and cook your soup, but also provide an attractive display to attract customers’ attention.

Rice Cookers

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Want a way to easily cook rice in large quantities? Rice Cookers not only allow you to easily cook rice, some models can also cook oatmeal, grits or liquids. The removable, nonstick pot is easy to clean and includes a moisture cup to collect water to prevent dripping on the counter.

Still Need Help?

If you’re still stuck on which piece of holding and warming equipment is right for your foodservice operation, give Busychef a call on free phone 0500 008 075. One of our sales team will gladly help you out with your needs!

See more at www.busychef.co.uk

Do you double hand wash?

imageTip of the Week: Did you know that when restaurant and other food service employees use the toilet, they should wash their hands before leaving the toilet and again in the kitchen before they return to their duties. That’s right – a double hand washing! Double hand washing is excellent practice for all restaurant and kitchen staff before they go back to their duties.

In the United States double hand washing is compulsory as legislated by the FDA, their equivalent to our Environmental Health section of the local authority.

There are 3 essential reasons for this hand washing policy:

1 – It is a simple yet very effective tool in reducing the possibility of a foodborne illness occurring in a food establishment.

2 – Customer perception should be a concern. If an employee comes back from the toilet and continues to take food to tables or serves drinks (and how many times have you seen this happen?), without going back to the kitchen first to wash his/her hands again, how many customers might conclude that the server didn’t wash his/her hands before handling food again?

3 – The easiest way to impress an Environmental Health Inspector is for the Inspector to witness many staff members washing hands periodically through an inspection.

Managers should train staff to wash their hands properly and effectively before leaving the toilet, and again before handling food or drinks.

All food business must have an accessible designated wash hand basin with hot and cold water, soap and hand towels for use by staff. You can buy wash hand basins from busyCHEF by going to busychef.co.uk

Make sure your ice is not covered in bacteria!

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Classeq provides advice for busyCHEF Blog readers to make sure your ice is in tip-top condition to minimise the risk of contamination.

According to recent research by the Health Protection Agency, dirty ice is being served at almost one in three pubs, restaurants and coffee shops, putting the health of customers at risk.  Tests carried out on ice, ice machines and utensils carried out by the HPA at 88 establishments identified that 30% showed clear evidence of poor hygiene.

One of the major problems identified was the failure to clean machines and scoops used to fill glasses and cups, clearly not acceptable to the paying customer who are at risk.

Nick Burridge, Director of Sales at Classeq understand the risk but as he explains, “At Classeq we are the leading suppliers of the Ice-o-Matic ice machines in the UK which have every commercial ice making requirement covered, from coffee shop to busy pubs, bars and restaurants, from small under the counter machines to those with large storage bins, with ice options such as ice cubes, flaked ice and nuggets.”

 “Ice is defined as food and a requirement of the Food Hygiene (England) Regulations 2006 is that it must be made, stored and handled so that it is not contaminated, and therefore the onus is on the staff and management to comply with the regulations,” Nick continues.

Clearly, there is an issue with contamination that occurs and there are three main causes of contamination:

1 – Physical contaminants such as dust, dirt, raw food, pests and people

2 – Chemical contaminants due to misuse of cleaning and maintenance chemicals

3 – Contaminated utensils such as scoops and other ice lifting utensils that come into contact with people, raw foods and other objects containing bacteria before touching the ice.

Nick continues, “There are some basic hygiene rules that need to be followed and below are twelve steps to reduce, and hopefully, eliminate the contamination of ice in an establishment.”

 1 – Connect the ice machine directly to the mains water supply, and avoid connecting to a water storage tank.

2 – Site the ice machine in a clean area away from possible sources of contamination such as bins, food preparation areas, chemicals etc.

3 – Always use the ice machine in accordance with the instructions supplied by the manufacturer

4 – Service the ice machine on a regular basis to ensure it is working appropriately and in hard water areas to ensure no limescale and other deposits are formed.

5 – Clean and sanitise the ice machine at least once a week, including the removal of any unused ice in the machine at the time.

6 – All utensils used to handle ice need to be cleaned and sanitised on a daily basis and checked to make sure they are not damaged.

7 – Use the correct chemicals to clean the machine, in accordance with the manufacturers instructions and to include non-abrasive cleaners, rinsing with clean, fresh water, wiping with a food safe antibacterial cleaner and rinsing thoroughly before reusing the machine.

8 – When using the ice machine, keep the lid closed whenever possible.

9 – Train staff how to use and clean the ice machine appropriately and ensure that all staff clearly understand the handling of edible ice.

10 – Maintain a good practice of personal hygiene and ensure that all staff clean their hands at all time before handling the ice scoops and ice should never be handled by hand.

11 – Never use the ice machine for storage of any other items.

12 – Keep a record of daily cleaning and maintenance ensure that this record is checked and that random spot-checks are undertaken to ensure that processes are followed appropriately.

Nick concludes, “Clearly the risk of ice contamination needs to be addressed but following a strict regime of training staff, cleaning equipment and maintaining best practice should help to  mitigate these risks and ensure that ice supplied is not contaminated and customers are left with a cool, refreshing, drink and no unexpected side effects.”

 Classeq offer a full range of ice machines to suit the needs of all establishments.   The Ice-o-Matic range enables easy, tool-free removal of key parts for maintaining hygiene standards providing quick and easy cleaning along with a manual self cleaning cycle to make cleaning and sanitising the machines easier.  Generous bin design allows for easy, ergonomic access to the ice for the operator and AgION antibacterial compound used to reduce harmful bacteria growth and maintain food safety between cleaning cycles.

Perfect for helping to minimise the risk of ice contamination.

With thanks to Classeq and Nick Burridge. Classeq ice makers are available at busyCHEF by clicking here.

Food Safety starts with Smart Restaurant Kitchen Design

restaurant-kitchen-plansDesigning restaurant kitchens can be very complicated. There are many factors to be considered when planning where to put equipment and what materials to use. Local authorities may require detailed documents showing the site plan, floor plan, equipment layout and plumbing/mechanical/finish schedules even before any construction begins. These plans should be developed with food safety in mind. The information in this post can be used as a general guide to help new restaurateurs understand environmental health and local authority requirements when designing their kitchens.

Site Plan
A site plan should show the facility and surrounding areas such as parking, drains, incoming services and bin areas. Some operators may want the option to hose down their bin areas to keep them clean, but this can’t be done if there is no adequate drainage. Consideration should be given to access for food deliveries and any nuisance caused by smells from kitchen ventilation and noise from fridge room equipment.

Floor Plan
This is the most important part of the planning process. Where to put equipment sets the flow of all restaurant operations. A good floor plan can increase efficiency for kitchen staff and servers and improve food safety. A bad floor plan can cause confusion and contribute to cross-contamination. The floor plan should show all areas of food service, storage, dishwashing, preparation, staff toilets and janitorial facilities.

Sink Requirements
Hand wash sinks should be convenient and easily accessible to all areas of the kitchen. To achieve this, multiple sinks may be needed. Employees should have access to hand wash sinks on the cook line, in prep areas and in the wash-up area. At least one mop sink should be available to fill up and dispose of mop water.

Adequate sinks must be available to show that pans and dishes can be washed separately from vegetables. The sinks should be large enough to submerge the largest piece of equipment. Seperate sinks are needed even if a dishwashing machine is installed.

Separate areas for dishwashing and food prep. If the kitchen is large enough, and to prevent cross-contamination, the dishwash area should have a separate entrance for staff to deliver dirty dishes without walking through any prep areas.

Equipment
Equipment on the cook line should be positioned to execute the menu efficiently as well as prevent raw meats from contacting ready-to-eat foods. This can be tricky, but putting the salad prep area on the opposite end from where raw meat is handled will keep foods from contaminating each other from storage and handling.

All equipment must be of commercial quality and fit for purpose Use a reputable kitchen installer to source the equipment. Stainless steel for all shelves and benches is now standard practice. To facilitate cleaning, all stationary equipment should be sealed to the wall or spaced for cleaning.

Finish Schedules
A finish schedule should show the materials used for all floors, walls and ceilings. It’s important to understand finishes in the kitchen will be different than in the toilets or restaurant areas. As a general rule, all finishes in food prep areas should be smooth, easily cleanable and impervious. Some local authorities also require that light colors be used so it’s easier to see if areas are clean. Typical kitchen finishes are correctly gloss painted or plastic clad walls, non-slip vinyl flooring coved to the walls, washable ceiling tiles or matt painted finish.

Plan Early to Save Time and Money
As you can see, a lot goes into planning a restaurant kitchen. Often, new operators don’t understand that decisions made in the beginning can greatly impact flow. This can lead to longer wait times, unhappy customers, cross-contamination and increased risk of illness—all of which can have a negative impact on sales. Start planning early with an emphasis on efficiency and food safety. Use a reputable kitchen installer to help with your design and choosing the correct equipment.

Each local authority has different plan review requirements. Submit plans early and don’t start construction until those plans are approved. The environmental health officer will have comments and concerns regarding the plans, and adjustments may need to be made. It could be costly if the work has already started without these changes on the final plans. Please consult your local authority for more information.

Using a reputable kitchen installer such as YCE Catering Equipment in Leeds could save you time and money. Give them a call on 0113 252 6566 or email info@yce.co.uk for further information.

The best choice of quality and reliable kitchen equipment and refrigeration at excellent web prices can be found at busyCHEF